Begin With the End In Mind: Let Evaluation Lead

Nothing says success better than provable results! So it is easy to see why the folks at Health Literacy Wisconsin are smiling from ear to ear. This past fall they put together a winning health communication campaign by sticking with the fundamentals: they did their research. Erin Aagesen, MS, MSPH, the Health Literacy Coordinator at Health Literacy Wisconsin, a division of Wisconsin Literacy, Inc., joined the Health Communication, Health Literacy and Social Sciences tweetchat to explain their process. Erin manages statewide health literacy interventions in partnership with Wisconsin Literacy’s 63 member literacy agencies, community-based agencies and health care organizations throughout Wisconsin. The plain language health communication campaign, ‘Let’s Talk about Flu’ was conducted this past fall and winter of 2011-2012. During this short timeframe, 53 workshops served 921 adults with low health literacy. Funding and support came from Anthem BCBS and Walgreens and resulted in a lesson book, a 1-hour workshop and flu vaccine vouchers. According to Erin, a key to their success was “making the information relevant to participants’ lives.” Another vital component to success was delivering workshops in “trusted settings where people already live, work, study and socialize.” “Most participants were adults from our 63 member literacy agencies, who are reading below the 5th grade level. We also worked with populations in which there is generally a large overlap with low literacy, including [the] homeless.” Community based organizations often take shortcuts to save time and money. Pre-testing campaign content is often left out. In this case, Health Literacy Wisconsin didn’t skip this important step, they “pre-tested our lesson book with physicians, adult learners and adult literacy program directors. This was an essential step; we learned a great deal and revised our program and materials based on this feedback. We’re all rushed, but I think scheduling time for feedback and revision upfront saved us time in the long run.” “You have to prioritize. We were successful because we made some decisions about what was crucial data and what was not.” All their stakeholders were gathered together prior to developing their evaluation plan. And they followed the crucial advice to “begin with the end in mind!” By taking that advice, the results were worth sharing. With an 85% completion rate of the pre- and post-tests they found that flu knowledge increased from 56% to 83%. The participants intention of getting the flu shot increased from 74% to 83% and 42% obtained the flu shot (tracked through voucher system provided by Walgreens). The University of Wisconsin Extension Cooperative Extension pamphlet provided Erin and her colleagues with the tools and the self-confidence to do it right. As Erin assures other community based organizations, “it’s OK not to be research experts. ‘There is no blueprint or recipe for conducting a good evaluation.’ Make it work for you!” For further information check out Erin’s tweetchat and the University of Wisconsin Extension Cooperative Extension evaluation tools, especially their booklet.

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