Patient-Centered Medicine Part 2

The etymology of the word “Patient” is described on  Webster’s site  as:

derived from the Latin word patiens, the present participle of the deponent verb pati, meaning “one who endures” or “one who suffers”. Patient is also the adjective form of patience. Both senses of the word share a common origin.

On Graduation Day, medical students become MDs and repeat this Modern Hippocratic Oath.  Here are a few of the lines about patients.

I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick….

I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

It is important to know what physicians think about the Modern Hippocratic Oath. In 2001, Nova did a program on the Hippocratic Oath and invited physicians to add to a doctor’s diary.  I found the following comments fascinating and illuminating and wish to provide them here today.

I have done my best working as an overworked, underpayed academic physician in high-risk obstetrics in a metropolitan city teaching university since then [saying the Hippocratic Oath at graduation from medical school]. I look back to the wisdom and guidance of Hippocrates everyday as I struggle to balance my duties, patient rights and allocation of hospital/societal resources for the sake of underprivileged and acutely ill mothers and their unborn children.

It is particularly evident in this modern era when more students are choosing residencies in radiology, anesthesiology, and pathology for the sake of their lifestyle. Our outstanding residency program in OB/Gyn has difficulty in filling our slots because of significant workload and lifestyle issues. These Hippocratic Oath dissenters tend to openly complain about excessive clinical workload despite obvious patient needs. Many of these individuals rationalize a “shift-mentality” as their future practice of medicine that justifies going home when they are “off-duty” despite any other professional obligations. It appears that “job quality” is a priority when compared to “professional duty” in the medical practice of these particular future physicians.

Some of this new breed of colleagues also have a public display of disrespect for the indigent, confused, and simplistic patient. Instead of becoming an advocate and/or protector of society’s weakest element, they would discard this needy population in preference for the medical procedure, economizing their clinical practice or optimizing their time at home with family and friends.

The most disconcerting attitude within this subset of these “New Age” practitioners is the blatant contempt and disrespect for their elder colleagues in our medical profession. Stated reasons are outdated practitioners and oblivious perspectives to the “modern face” of medicine. While I am still at an intermediate stage in my professional career, I continue to learn more about the practice and ethics of my specific profession from my soon-retiring colleagues than from any journal, Web site, or national meeting.

Generation X has recently matriculated into the field of clinical medicine, and our national healthcare system will only suffer further when we tolerate physicians who do not care, apply inappropriate medical techniques, and have little professional respect for the patient-physician relationship as outlined in this product of early medical philosophy.

P.S. I continue to identify a small group of non-generation-X students and residents each year who defy this societal transformation and who strive to follow in the footsteps of myself and my elders. My solution for this “Gen X syndrome in medicine” is a realistic Third World medical experience for junior trainees (which I have done on several occasions) to give them a perspective that healthcare is a right for all human beings, not a scheduled or convenient privilege!!! —R.E.B.

R.E.B.’s comments describe a fundamental difference in newer physicians which I have described in my tribute previously.  The Occupy Health Care movement needs to address the issue described by R.E.B. “Some of this new breed of colleagues also have a public display of disrespect for the indigent, confused, and simplistic patient.” This attitude can be found in other types of health care providers, as well.  Dismissing social factors that affect health is part of this phenomenon.

 “In itself the definition of patient doesn’t imply suffering or passivity but the role it describes is often associated with the definitions of the adjective form: “enduring trying circumstances with even temper”. Webster’s Dictionary.

Patients should not be patient with this.

It is important that physicians remember the Hippocratic Oath they took and understand this:

What is the essence of a Hippocratic Oath? Simple and echoed throughout time, whatever the words: “May I care for others as I would have them care for me.”
Daniel G. Deschler, M.D., FACS

As leaders of health care teams physicians need to set an example to all people in the health care setting.  If there is to be change, there needs  to be political activism on the part of physicians.  Health care should be available to all.  Physicians need to be paid, but also duly rewarded for honoring  the Oath they take on the day they become physicians.

 

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