Anyone Can Get Lung Cancer

deanas photo“My beloved mother was diagnosed with Stage IIIb non-small cell lung cancer in early June, 2012,” says Deana Hendrickson. “I knew virtually nothing about it…was heartbroken, and frankly angry, to learn that over half of those with lung cancer die within a year of diagnosis.”

The estimated new cases and deaths from non-small cell and small cell lung cancer combined this year are 228,190.  Deaths from lung cancer are estimated 158,480.  For both men and women, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, claiming more lives each year than colon, prostate, ovarian and breast cancers combined.

One reason for the high mortality rate is that lung cancer is difficult to catch early.  Twenty-five percent of people who are diagnosed have no symptoms at all: the cancer is first discovered on an X-ray.  In others, coughing or shortness of breath are ignored or believed to be symptoms of flu or allergies. Often when symptoms become more severe, the cancer has spread.

Deana’s research also revealed that the 5-year survival rate for lung cancer is less than 16%.  “This dismal prognosis was made even more upsetting when I discovered that lung cancer federal research funding lags far behind other major cancers despite the fact that lung cancer is the number one cancer killer,” she relates.

Deana is on a mission to educate on this deadly disease. “I was so shocked by my own ignorance that I figured others must be just as clueless,” she says. She learned from experience the terrible stigma of lung cancer, “Mom and I learned first-hand about the stigma of a lung cancer diagnosis (the “did she smoke” factor, as if it’s a deserved disease).”

Between 15 and 20 percent of people who get lung cancer haven’t smoked a day in their lives.  Sadly the efforts made to dissuade cigarette smoking have had the effect of stigmatizing everyone who gets lung cancer. “I am the first to admit that I once thought lung cancer was a deserved disease. I’ve watched the commercials and read the ads linking smoking with lung cancer.”  Deana has changed her mind, “Smoking cessation and prevention efforts are wonderful…Unfortunately, these programs have…had the unintentional effect of perpetuating the perception that lung cancer patients asked for it. It took much thought and soul searching for me to realize that whether smoker, ex-smoker, never-smoker, no one deserves this awful disease, nor any disease for that matter.“

Exposure to second hand smoke, radon gas, asbestos, heredity and air pollution are some of the causes of lung cancer in non-smokers.

Deana is educating through twitter, founding the twitter chat the Lung Cancer Social Media twitter chat, hashtag #lcsm.  Based on the successful Breast Cancer Social Media chat (#bcsm), Deana is hopeful that the involvement of physicians, like chat moderator Jack West @JackWestMD and participant Martt Katz @subatomicdoc (who came up with #lcsm), will provide the kind of support and guidance to assure the chat is timely, supportive and accurate.  “I really wanted to have a hashtag to unify the lung cancer community; a “place” where we could all be as one group.”

Deana’s determination is based in loss.  “I was [my mother’s] primary caretaker,” Deana relates, She suffered terribly,” Deana remembers.  Deana lost her mother just nine months after she was diagnosed, in March 2013.  As she mourns she is taking action, “I’m a great believer in the power of people making the choice to do something, anything, to make the world a better place. In Judaism, it’s known as Tikkun Olam (literally “world repair” or repairing the world). That’s my inspiration.”

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Good news on Metastases Research!

Just a short note “quote”…

The Answer to How Breast Cancer Invades Bone

Researchers recently solved the mystery of how breast cancer takes root in the bone. Now, the discovery has led to an experimental drug for breast cancer that has spread to the bone.

At Princeton University, Society grantee Yibin Kang, PhD, found breast cancer cells use a protein called Jagged1 to upset the normal balance of bone builders and bone demolishers. Jagged1 recruits cells that normally break down bone to dig deeper into it. This in turn releases molecules that further spur cancer growth.

“We knew the bone is a fertile soil for breast cancer to spread to. But we didn’t know why. We didn’t know how to make bone less fertile soil,” says Kang, Princeton’s Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis professor of molecular biology. “Now that we know, the next step is to design drugs to break that vicious cycle.”

Breast cancer spreads, or metastasizes, to the bone in 70% to 80% of patients with advanced breast cancer. These malignant cells invade the spine, ribs, pelvis and other bones, causing pain, fractures and other complications. Current treatments offer symptom control but little else, Kang says. “The hope is that with more options, more combined agents, we can effectively control bone metastasis and hopefully treat it as a chronic condition,” he says.

Kang and his lab team are now working with drug maker Amgen to test an experimental monoclonal antibody (a man-made protein) that blocks Jagged1 in mice.

Kang hopes his quest in the lab one day results in lives saved in the clinic. “What we try to do in the lab is to figure out what the enemy is capable of and how cancer achieves its goal of spreading and killing patients,” Kang says. “You have to know your enemy to defeat it.”

(Please be advised this is a direct quote from American Cancer Society)

Cancer Language: Erasing Reality

culture:  the integrated pattern of human behavior that includes thought, speech, action, and artifacts and depends upon the human capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations  Merriam-Websters.

The first  Sunday in June is set aside as National Cancer Survivorship Day.

It is described on the website as “an annual, worldwide Celebration of Life,” as “a day to unite together in a show of solidarity of collective cancer survivorship.”

Yet how do people who have cancer feel about this day?  A large number of bloggers have answered that

question.  Yvonne Watterson of Phoenix Arizona is one of those bloggers. She is part of a large cyber community, bloggers and twitter activists who tweet with the hashtag #bcsm.  “I have been educated by amazing bloggers. I knew nothing of metastatic cancer until #bcsm.”

With no family history, negatives on all her mammograms, and a love for fruits, vegetables and exercise, Yvonne was caught off guard by her diagnosis of breast cancer on November 11, 2011.  As she states, “I used to complain about the pace of life as a woman trying to play equally well the parts of mother, wife, friend, and boss.”   Not anymore.  And since that day she has written about her experience on “Time to Consider the Lilies.”

One of her fellow bloggers is Marie Ennis-O’Conner.   In Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer  The stimulus for this posting was the media’s coverage of Robin Gibbs death  ‘Robin Gibbs lost his long battle with cancer.’ In Why Words Matter,  she asked other bloggers the question, “Do you feel the exclusivity of the term survivor focuses attention upon those who are living, essentially erasing those who are dying from the disease?”    Yvonne took up the challenge to try to write about the language of cancer.

These women with breast cancer are trying to bring awareness that the terms, “battle,” “winning,” and “survivor” are all the part of the language of the cancer culture.  As Yvonne states, “Language is inextricably tied to culture,

and a definite cancer culture has evolved with a language all its own…There are so many messages out there suggesting that perhaps I chose to take on a battle and then did something to defeat an opponent.”  One of the most unsettling aspects of the language of this culture is the exclusion that so many feel.

“Those who are dying or have died are described as ‘losing’…  I don’t think we can really choose not to be victimized by cancer. It’s an unexpected assault, defying explanation.”

Yvonne believes the media treats breast cancer differently.  “…Breast cancer…has been sanitized by [the] media.  Too many pink euphemisms, myths and war metaphors are attached to cancer.  Is this a concerted effort to conceal the reality of it?”  Yvonne asks.

“I almost cried when I read Marie’s words about [erasing those who are dying],” says Yvonne. “It reminds me of a post I discovered by someone identified as Kelly K. Here it is:

“With no family history, no positive genes, I was diagnosed with stage III lobular triple positive breast cancer at 29 and mets [metastases] at 30. That year my oncologist practice selected me to be honored at a Komen luncheon. I spent a few hours …being interviewed for a video..[Komen] do[es] about the honorees’ breast cancer story…. Komen edited out every reference to my mets in the video….If that isn’t pink washing, I don’t know what is…”

Setting aside a day for “survivors” may seem innocuous to some but not for many in the breast cancer blogging community.    As Yvonne points out,  it “seems so insensitive and disrespectful to those who have been killed by the disease or those who are unable to live without being shackled to it.” For clarification Yvonne explained that the word “’Survivor’ …seems to focus on a stage of the disease that is more ‘socially acceptable.’ The often harrowing stories of those who are living with metastatic breast cancer are rarely publicized by mainstream media.”

In addition to erasing the fact that breast cancer spreads in 30% of those who are diagnosed, integrated in the culture of breast cancer is  “a wholly dreadful expectation that you should be more cheerful if you got the ‘good’ kind of cancer.”  Likewise guilt is part of the cancer culture.  “‘Prevention’ is wrapped up with ‘surviving’ and tends to make me think I could have done something to prevent the diagnosis.”

Somehow those with cancer must be like the contestants on the reality show “Survivor.”  They must outwit, outplay and outlast cancer.  Second guessing themselves is the fate of those living with this cancer culture.  “I  am still indignant about cancer showing up in my life and I am afraid of it progressing. Before the diagnosis, I hadn’t given it a second thought … it was the thing that happened to other people, perhaps women who missed their mammograms or who had a family history, but not to me. Why me? And so I go back to thinking I may have caused it,  which I know makes no sense whatsoever, but I can’t help it.”

So what word does Yvonne believe encompasses why one person has cancer and another doesn’t or why one person’s cancer spreads and another’s doesn’t.  “I don’t know the “right word” for those of us ensnared in the complexity of  cancer. But it seems more to do with ‘luck.'”

In her post,“he not busy being born is busy dying,”  Yvonne draws parrallels between avoiding the reality of cancer and escaping the “troubles” in Northern Ireland.  “I relate my experience with cancer to growing up in Northern Ireland. We didn’t live in fear every minute but knew we were lucky.’Devices of Detachment’ by Damian Gorman explores how Northern Ireland’s people distanced themselves from

junecaldwell.wordpress.com

violence. Seems we do same with cancer.”

I’ve come to point the finger
I’m rounding on my own
The decent cagey people
I count myself among …
We are like rows of idle hands
We are like lost or mislaid plans
We’re working under cover
We’re making in our homes
Devices of detachment
As dangerous as bombs.

#BCSM and the blogger community have been a lifeline for Yvonne.  “Were it not for this online community, I know I would be quite lost in the culture of breast cancer.”

There she has support and a place free of cancer culture expectations,  “I am so grateful for the solidarity and the safety I have found within the blogging community.  I think we all cry out ‘Why?’ and our collective attempt to see that this question is answered is powerful.  I believe we are unified in our search for answers to questions we are afraid to ask within a world that seems to ‘celebrate’ those who drew the long straw… But, for me personally, saying I survived cancer would be like saying I survived growing up in Northern Ireland. I would never say that. I would say that I was just luckier than others.”

Consider the lilies, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin; but I tell you, not even Solomon in all his glory clothed himself like one of these.”  (Luke 12: 27)

Angels In Our Midst 2

Pinktober–never heard this word before starting to use twitter in October 2011.  Now I’ll never think of October in the same way again.  All because of the dynamism of one woman, Rachel Cheetham Moro.

Her advocacy  was born from painful experience and a desire to save other women.  Using her skills honed from a Masters Degrees in Business and Tax from Fordham University and experience working for Ernst & Young as an international tax consultant, this Aussie took on Big Pink, the Susan G. Komen Foundation.  Her summary of the financial shenanigans that are occurring at the Komen Foundation clearly illustrate why people the world over need to re-think their giving.

Yet while she journaled her struggle with metastatic breast cancer– her pain, both physical and emotional–she also gave voice to unsung heroes in her blog Can-Do Women.

A traveler, she visited 40 countries in her short time on earth, her wonder and love of life is apparent for all to see in her writing.  She continued writing even after losing the use of her arm–even during severe illness, she answered emails from people like me.

She has inspired me to continue to advocate for women with metastatic breast cancer and to work to change the Komen Foundation’s direction in its use of funds and to motivate others to support organizations that are really looking for a cure.

Rachel, thank you for being open and alive and giving to so many.  Thank you to her friends, family and her Beloved, for helping her to share her life, her intelligence and her wit with all of us.

 

 

Dance Like No One’s Watching

Do you live each moment unflinchingly?  Do you taste life the way you do the last bite of your favorite food or savor  its essence as you would the fragrance of summer’s final gardenia?

Crisp…the deep blue of an October sky…exhilarating…the ocean spray on a winter day… vibrant…the ecalls of cardinals in April…fresh…the laugh of a toddler

What if you were with a group of people who are all present…all noticing?

What if you were with a group of people who were all searching for three words to express this sense of be-ing and capture it?  Instead of New Year resolutions, finding three words to live by…

That’s what happened January 2, 2012 ….Soul Speech.

When you hear soul-speech, or in the case of a tweetchat, read and interact with people whose hearts are singing, you are lifted up and changed.

Soaring the stratosphere, the group that tweet under the hatchtag #bcsm, reached for Jupiter as each shared the three words that they will use as guideposts for 2012.

Stales: T3: Cancer’s taught me that the vision and goals will always change. Very few things in life can be “planned

Itsthebunk:  I’ve had it 3 X since 1994, so there’s been a LOT of evolving & personal growth. Still hard2 figure out where it fits in my “identity

Ihatebreastcanc: I used to think bc happened to “older” people or “other” people. But not me.

Bcsisterhood: T3: I was the girl who did EVERYTHING right & I still got breast cancer. James’s death again reminded me the best laid plans go south

#bcsm stands for breast cancer and social media…many of the participants have had cancer in one form of another…although most have had or are experiencing treatment for breast cancer. Some participants are or have been caregivers of someone who has cancer.  The participants of #bcsm are welcoming and not picky…they are supportive of each other and anyone else who wants to participate.

Their three words have meaning;

JediPD: “Serenity” covers all: conquers fear[,] builds courage[,] inspires elegance and calm

Lauriek: “Love”, “hope”, “bravery”

BethlGainer: Peace, perseverence, courage

JackieFox12: Mine are create, nurture, appreciate. I love this three-word concept. Resolutions are too much like homework.

BRCAinfo: love community peace

DrAttai: : My words were resilience, rejuvenation, and serenity

MaverickNY: T1: mine are rebuild, refresh, renew

BCsisterhood: Three things you need to survive most anything: God, guts & perseverance.

Brandie185: 3 words … I’m bad at this kind of thing, but I’d go with celebrate, enjoy, heal.

Now, pick one of your 3 words… and expand on that… What does that word mean to you and your vision for 2012?

jodyms: Discernment: making the most of what matters. Don’t sweat the small stuff

itsthebunk:I’ve used 2, 3-word phrases, which works 4 me. It’s all about emerging from the past & being back out in the world, building anew.

JediPD: We all live lives of uncertainty. Have Long term goals and short term plans. Buy green apples. Watch the sunrise. Smile. Live!

BCSisterhood: combo of “courage” & blind faith, & ability to *really* feel that I can have “it all” too. Being the phoenix & soaring

BCsisterhood: RT @jorunkjones@AllThingsCrgvr Yes, I hope to giggle my way through much of this year. Giggle, half full glasses & an open heart

When asked about making resolutions…

Bcsisterhood: @stales T2: We all have the resolution to live life and be healthy, but the truth’s a little scary because it’s out of our hands

Debmthomas: @stales T2 looking at a whole year can be daunting to anyone, ESP cancer survivor, so think for the next 24 hrs I will do …..

Annwax: @lauriek There is no reason why you asking to live well in longer terms, That is the human nature, and everyone wants that

Jackiefox12: T2 I don’t know if resolutions were harder to keep as survivor but I know they didn’t get easier. I’m not a fan of resolutions

Jodyms: T2: Each year makes the resolutions — or the three words – become more meaningful. Done with anything that’s extraneous

Chemobrainfog: T2 goal setting, yes I have goals but I still try to stay in the moment.

Jackiefox12: @BCSisterhood You know what they say, If you want to make God laugh, make a plan. But plans are important.

stales: T2: I set a mini one each night: That I get up the next morning, put two feet on the floor, & go

BCsisterhood: I’ve opened my heart to the possibilities of a new year & I’m looking forward to being surprised, pleasantly, I hope

Allthingscrgvr; T2 One day at a time, one foot in front of the other

How has (or did) cancer change your vision of yourself? Have you developed a new one yet?

Feistypbluegecko: T3 and I know longer take so much for granted, am more proactive

Jodyms: @JediPD I think we are, too:) I love watching what happens here every Monday. Cancer stinks. But talking about it w/friends rocks.

Bcsisterhood: @jackiefox12 Our resiliency knows no bounds. Mankind can, and does, survive the most horrendous things

Feistybluegecko:  Some goals can help us, building our strength for the times that might not be so easy, and giving us heart for when times are good 🙂

Annwax:  Life is a roller coaster ride, thr r times when u are on the top, and then u are on the bottom, you must stay on the ride of wellness

Feistybluegecko: For me, having these goals has been a reminder to make the most of good times, appreciate the good things

Annwax: Finding contentment in what you have, may help the uncertainty of what might come.

Jodyms: @talkabouthealth @jediPD – this is something @being_sarah and I discussed earlier: take time for tea, and looking for Jupiter.

Stales: FYI, jupiter is just below the moon tonight, go look!

Jackiefox12: T3 I learned I’m more resilient than I thought. And less squeamish 🙂 not sure that’s a vision!

Debmthomas: @jodyms love that, I write out what my “perfect week” would be like, what elements I need to feel good, then work them in

Jedipd: What a wonderful family of friends!

Chemobrainfog: just saw Jupiter wow!

Feistybluegecko: T3;) cancer shook me to the core, confronted me with reality of mortaity, made me take stock so I decided to recalibrate and refocus

Lauriek: T3- So much changed when I got cancer. Still struggling to find the new “vision” – 6 years post diagnosis and 5 years post mets

jackiefox12: My advice if in tx: it’s part of you, not all of you. You have love & laughter, family & friends. Be sad or mad or glad but be you.

Debmthomas: @stales …I was just thinking tonight that any day can be the first day of a new year, each day has great potential

Stales: Let’s make a plan to revisit our Three Words for the first #bcsm chat in July of this year! Okay? Deal!

Stales:  Good night, Moon! RT @chemobrainfog: Good night, Jupiter?

And they have fun!***

Does your soul speak?

Heart Song, Soul Speech, Dancing like no one’s watching…try it.

** My three words Dr Attai

***Shaping 2012 with 3 words

*** I can’t do it justice here.  Please visit the website to read the transcript!