Patient Advocate–Pat Mastors

Empowered Through Loss

Creating A Patient Advocate

patmastors1patient advocatePat Mastors’, patient advocate, “medical awakening” came with the tragic loss of her father. “My father, an otherwise healthy 76-year-old, fell down stairs at home and fractured vertebra in the neck. Surgery to fix it went well. But his intestines burst two days post-op. Later we learned it was from C.diff.”

Clostridium difficile or C. diff is a bacterial infection that “is most commonly associated with health care, occurring in hospitals and other health care facilities where a much higher percentage of people carry the bacteria,” according to Mayo Clinic’s website. It is easily passed along via spores that last on surfaces for weeks or even months.

Because of this hospital-acquired infection, Pat’s father survived only six months. “As a reporter, I felt people needed to know how easily unintended harm happens in even the best hospitals. Plus as his advocate and only daughter, I wondered if I’d known more, could I have made difference? I’ve been working on it ever since.”

Simple Communication is Needed

Having been a television newscaster taught Pat “efficient, simple communication of critical information empowers people to make informed choices.” Applied to healthcare she believes it transformative: “cultivates a more responsive and transparent system.” Her journalist’s training opens her mind to the many sides of any story, “I have spent years doing my best to understand the entire landscape and all the players in it. Nothing’s simple in healthcare!”

What You Need To Know Before Going Into the Hospital

Through her patient advocate research Pat’s gleaned five of the most important things someone going into the hospital need to know:

1) The third leading cause of death in the US is errors and infections. “Up to 440,000 are killed per year.”
2) “Ask your surgeon, “How many of these have you done? What’s the infection/complication rate? You learn a lot by how s/he responds.”
3) “Bring an advocate! Don’t go it alone.” Pat recommends a firm, non-adversarial professional who knows how to deal with people.
4) Understand that shift changes and “hand-offs” to other staff, are the time when errors happen—“things slip through the cracks.”
5) “Take notes, speak up if you see disconnects.”

Have Your Family With You In Hospital

Knowledge is power, and Pat knows firsthand that this is the case. Suddenly her daughter, who had walked the Appalachian Trail, was in the hospital. Jessica came down with a rare paralyzing nerve disorder called Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). In GBS a person’s own immune system damages their nerve cells, causing muscle weakness and sometimes paralysis. “The challenge was to get the best from modern medicine, AND the best HUMAN investment from us, clinicians, input from other advocates, research, nutrition, etc.” Pat and the whole family were at Jessica’s bedside. “With shift changes and handoffs, we (family) were the only constant. We helped keep clinicians’ focused on her.”

Her family’s presence helped. Pat tells the story of one of many interactions which show the difference that can be achieved by having the family present. Jessica was having a radiological test and her pain medicine was wearing off. Pat asked the technician about getting transport back to Jessica’s room. She was told it would take as long as it takes for Transport to arrive. “I asked “how long before Transport gets here”?” The Chief of Radiology overheard the “I don’t know” answer and he himself wheeled the gurney! “This does not happen if you are not there to look them in the eye….” Pat says. “All doctors and nurses feel good when they are being human and kind with you… There are just so many distractions, WE FAMILY members’ presence reminds them.”

With the efforts of all the players, (physicians, nurses, family) focused on Jessica, she was out of the hospital significantly earlier than projected. “In 7 days (instead of 23), fully recovered in 3 months (instead of 6-12),” Pat states.

The Patient Pod

ABOUT-Patient-Pod-image-alone-102.5-kb Patient AdovcateMaking a difference for others is part of Pat’s advocacy. She created the Patient Pod. “I created it to bring patients hand hygiene, access to personal items, plus a way to take and store notes, post message (like “patient white board”) and keep discharge stuff organized. I wanted patients to have autonomy, dignity, things comforting and familiar, in a place where nothing you touch is yours.” In addition, the Patient Pod includes a plastic sleeve for the TV remote control, one of the dirtiest items in a patient’s room.

Design to Survive

She is also writing. Her recent book as a patient advocate,Design to Survive, proposes the IKEA model for theDTS-New-Cover Patient Advocate healthcare setting. She shows how a “model of partnership, savings and shared responsibility serves both provider and consumers worldwide.” As her table of contents points out:

“If IKEA designed health care…

1. We would always feel welcome

2. Instructions would be understandable to a 5th grader

3. A one-stop website would help us learn, connect, and plan

4. We’d get tools for success when we walked in the door

5. We customers would have to roll up our sleeves and help

6. Prices would be clearly marked…and we’d pay our own bills

7. The team that serves us would act more team-like

8. Hackers (the good kind) would thrive

9. It would live to innovate.”

Pat believes that simplicity saves lives and in that simplicity the patient’s voice is essential. “Patients/consumers need to speak up where appropriate, take time to give feedback, good and bad. Doctors, nurses are under the gun for performance: when they go the extra mile, write their bosses! If care’s poor, tell that, too.”

Pat Needs Your Help to Help Others

Presently Pat is looking for funding to educate more patient advocates, “We need more opportunities for the patients voice to be integrated into all aspects of care. The problem is, who are ‘Patient Advocates’? We’re self-defined, like ‘travelers.’” She believes that Patient Advocates need more professional development opportunities “so we can bring not just stories, but tangible and actionable take-aways to our audiences.” If you have any ideas for funding this endeavor, please comment on this blog post or at Pat’s Blog.

This post was developed from the transcript of #HCHLITSS chat December 19.

First published on #HCHLITSS Health Communication Health Literacy and Social Sciences.

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Trying to Change the World for the Better: Meet Medivizor

“Medivizor’s vision is to improve the lives of people with serious medical conditions and those who care for them and to effectively medivizorapply software and the social web in the field of health for the betterment of humanity. This might sound like a lofty goal, and indeed, it is. We want to change the world for the better!”

As one satisfied patient, AnneMarie Ciccarella has pronounced, “Step Aside Dr. Google:  Enter Medivizor.” As the CEO of Medivizor, Tal Givoly describes, “Today, when people become sick, they often use the web to find information.  They find too much information.   Much of it, irrelevant. Much of it, not easy to understand and interpret.   Most frustrating [for them is]  finding something that seems hopeful, and wasting precious time with [their] doctor [only] to be disappointed.”

Within this dilemma, is Medivizor’s purpose. Medivizor provides medical and health information, vetted by physicians, to subscribers.  That information is personalized to their specific diagnosis  and delivered to them on an ongoing basis. Medivizor takes the futility out of the web search.

And the best part about it:  It’s a free service.

“It’s a subscription service. You sign up once, begin getting information from then on. That’s another key attribute,” relates COO Ronen Keinan. Ronen  Right now, the service supports breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, melanoma, and diabetes and is adding more diagnoses as they grow.  Even if the service doesn’t support your diagnosis now, “You can sign up now and put in your primary medical condition – and we’ll let you know when we add support for it,” Mr. Givoly states.

The first question you might ask is, “How are they doing this?”

Tal“We have a medical staff that’s overseen by our Chief Medical Officer.  Some review is automated and some human–physicians and PhD’s–that do peer-reviews, ” Mr. Givoly states.  Medivizor relies on content from PubMed.  “We strive to provide ONLY relevant information in words most can understand and act upon….The information is intended to provide value to the patient and or caregiver (and medical team). We develop a medical profile for the individual.  Then we semantically match new information according to that meta-data,” Mr. Givoly explains.

The health information provided is explanations of cutting-edge medical and scientific research, notifications of matching clinical trials,  lifestyle tips, community resources, and relevant treatment options. “Decisions of whether to include content is a medical team decision that gauges level of evidence and user interest ,” Mr. Keinan says. 

As Ms Ciccarella states, “A big part for me?  It’s interactive.  I let them know if information is helpful or not and why.”  And Medivizor respondsaacr to feedback.   

Medivizor’s formative team includes Tal Givoly, Chief Executive Officer.  Mr. Givoly was Chief Scientist of Amdocs (DOX), where he headed up innovation activities across the $3B company. Before that he held leadership positions in product management, software and product development. Ronen Keinan is their Chief Operating Officer. Keinan has 20 year of experience in high-tech and was most recently the Vice President of Portfolio Management at Nokia Siemens Networks (NSN).  Oren Fuerst, Ph.D., Chairman of the Board,  is a seasoned entrepreneur, investor, and author. Dr. Fuerst built, and continues to lead a number of companies focusing on medical devices and health informatics.  Prof. Steven Kaplan (MD) is the Chief Medical Officer. He is Chief of the Institute of Bladder and Prostate Health at Weill Cornell Medical College and also serves as Director of the Iris Cantor Men’s Health Center at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

The motivation for starting Medivizor comes from life experiences of its founders. “Each of the founders had a personal perspective and they knew each other over time and came together. For example, Oren Fuerst was a caregiver for his mother’s cancer and experienced the information problem first hand. Even though he was very knowledgeable and well-connected, it was just overwhelming and impossible to keep track.”  Mr. Givoly relates.  “Prof. Kaplan, a world-renowned doctor and researcher, has people coming in every day with irrelevant Google printouts.   And I saw good friends cope with their young child’s leukemia and what they had to go through in terms of medical research.   We got together and built the product/service/team to solve the big problem:  That medical information isn’t personalized.  That despite the enormous amount of information, finding ‘the right stuff’ is simply ineffective and inefficient.”

At this point, the start-up is a labor of love.  They are searching for ways to keep the service going but they are certain of one thing, “Medivizor is not intended for marketing,” Mr. Givoly states.  “There’s a lot of great information on web and  a lot of marketing.  Medivizor is not intended for marketing.” The founders are using three models to obtain some return on investment, first, “premium services to be introduced in future, second, licensing of software to medical professionals and third, referrals (clinical trials, treatment, etc.). But, business is not determining the information that is provided,” Mr. Givoly reiterates.

“What we provide is unique in many ways. First, is that it is truly personal: The user doesn’t “search” for information; they get information just relevant for them. We know enough about the person to do so. We sift through all the information and find what’s relevant, couple this with our medical team insights and the social web (crowdsourcing). We are HIPAA compliant and safeguard user data!” Mr. Keinan states.

“When I went to sign up,” says Summer Plum, a patient subscriber. “It immediately recognized Ehlers-Danlos (a rare genetic disorder characterized by extremely loose joints, fragile or stretchy skin, a genetic disorder) which is novel and nice.”  Ms. Ciccarella notes, “I use it for me and for my mom with metastatic breast cancer. It’s useful and helpful.  I am thrilled with the site…. ”

Making the content of journal articles accessible to everyone is a challenge.  “We aim for 10th grade English. We may personalize based on literacy in future. We take it down from, literally, Flesch-Kincaid grade levels of 18-22 down to 10. That’s a gap.”   To deal with this difficulty, they have added a “help box.”  Ms. Ciccarella remarks,  “There is a “helpful” box to interact back.. .if enough people said, ‘HUH?’ they would rewrite and resend information.  I have returned questions in the “helpful” box …. and got back a clarification of the information.”

“We intend it to be suitable for both the e-Patient and the average person. The balance is delicate, I admit. ” Mr. Givoly states. “However, data we’ve seen suggests that it does include ~90% of US adults.”

The company has a long list of conditions they are working to add.  “We’d like anybody coping with a serious or chronic medical condition to add Medivizor to their tools.   We believe strongly in being smart/engaged patients. Medivizor can help save time/effort and focus medical information checking.   Medivizor provides you info and ongoing updates specifically for your situation, as new things become available. If you want to know when we support a condition of interest… You can sign up and put in that primary medical condition – and we’ll let you know when we add support for it,” Mr. Givoly adds.

I can only say one thing: It’s not the same as anything out there. Clean interface and ongoing information.” says Ms. Ciccarella.  Dr. Gia Sison, a physician recently turned breast cancer patient agrees, “Once people try it, you truly appreciate its usefulness!  Just signed up. Nice website and easy to understand both from a doctor/patient point of view.” 

Patients can use the information and resources they receive from Medivizor to collaborate with  their local primary care physicians.  However, Medivizor doesn’t provide medical advice, nor does it replace a person’s medical team – it supports it.  Users can simply share what they get in Medivizor directly  with the ‘share with doctor’ feature. 

Ms. Plum says, It does take an immense amount of personal knowledge to be able to sort through all the information available [on the web]. ”  Mr. Givoly agrees, ” That’s one of the challenges we try to address: Simply what you need to know….We try to package that and we try to help build on knowledge.  Provide general knowledge and then become more specific. So it’s gradual.

Dr. Sison agrees, “In this world of medical information overload on the net it’s vital to have a one-stop hub for all (healthcare professionals/patients).”  Ms. Ciccarella states, “The site is FOR patients. Helps us be better members of our medical teams. We can ask the right questions and make best use of doctor’s time.”

Patient Advocate, Claudia Nichols states, “I see Medivizor as a clinical resource for my practice!”

 “We strive to provide as much transparency as we can.  Our mission is truly to make the world a better place by applying software and the social web for the betterment of humanity. We take great care to protect our user’s data and privacy.    We do not share personal information with others without explicit consent of the users. Best scientific evidence is always the prime consideration when sharing information with users. If there are controversial matters – we coach to reflect that.  If anything is ever sponsored, we would, obviously, make it very plain to see that.  Bottom line – we are trying to do good and avoid tarnishing our reputation. “

In the end, patient endorsements speak to Medivizor’s value.  As Ms Ciccarella states, “I can’t say enough about the service! “

Based on the twitter chat #HCHLITSS Health Communication, Health Literacy and Social Sciences

Patient-Centered Medicine Part 2

The etymology of the word “Patient” is described on  Webster’s site  as:

derived from the Latin word patiens, the present participle of the deponent verb pati, meaning “one who endures” or “one who suffers”. Patient is also the adjective form of patience. Both senses of the word share a common origin.

On Graduation Day, medical students become MDs and repeat this Modern Hippocratic Oath.  Here are a few of the lines about patients.

I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick….

I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

It is important to know what physicians think about the Modern Hippocratic Oath. In 2001, Nova did a program on the Hippocratic Oath and invited physicians to add to a doctor’s diary.  I found the following comments fascinating and illuminating and wish to provide them here today.

I have done my best working as an overworked, underpayed academic physician in high-risk obstetrics in a metropolitan city teaching university since then [saying the Hippocratic Oath at graduation from medical school]. I look back to the wisdom and guidance of Hippocrates everyday as I struggle to balance my duties, patient rights and allocation of hospital/societal resources for the sake of underprivileged and acutely ill mothers and their unborn children.

It is particularly evident in this modern era when more students are choosing residencies in radiology, anesthesiology, and pathology for the sake of their lifestyle. Our outstanding residency program in OB/Gyn has difficulty in filling our slots because of significant workload and lifestyle issues. These Hippocratic Oath dissenters tend to openly complain about excessive clinical workload despite obvious patient needs. Many of these individuals rationalize a “shift-mentality” as their future practice of medicine that justifies going home when they are “off-duty” despite any other professional obligations. It appears that “job quality” is a priority when compared to “professional duty” in the medical practice of these particular future physicians.

Some of this new breed of colleagues also have a public display of disrespect for the indigent, confused, and simplistic patient. Instead of becoming an advocate and/or protector of society’s weakest element, they would discard this needy population in preference for the medical procedure, economizing their clinical practice or optimizing their time at home with family and friends.

The most disconcerting attitude within this subset of these “New Age” practitioners is the blatant contempt and disrespect for their elder colleagues in our medical profession. Stated reasons are outdated practitioners and oblivious perspectives to the “modern face” of medicine. While I am still at an intermediate stage in my professional career, I continue to learn more about the practice and ethics of my specific profession from my soon-retiring colleagues than from any journal, Web site, or national meeting.

Generation X has recently matriculated into the field of clinical medicine, and our national healthcare system will only suffer further when we tolerate physicians who do not care, apply inappropriate medical techniques, and have little professional respect for the patient-physician relationship as outlined in this product of early medical philosophy.

P.S. I continue to identify a small group of non-generation-X students and residents each year who defy this societal transformation and who strive to follow in the footsteps of myself and my elders. My solution for this “Gen X syndrome in medicine” is a realistic Third World medical experience for junior trainees (which I have done on several occasions) to give them a perspective that healthcare is a right for all human beings, not a scheduled or convenient privilege!!! —R.E.B.

R.E.B.’s comments describe a fundamental difference in newer physicians which I have described in my tribute previously.  The Occupy Health Care movement needs to address the issue described by R.E.B. “Some of this new breed of colleagues also have a public display of disrespect for the indigent, confused, and simplistic patient.” This attitude can be found in other types of health care providers, as well.  Dismissing social factors that affect health is part of this phenomenon.

 “In itself the definition of patient doesn’t imply suffering or passivity but the role it describes is often associated with the definitions of the adjective form: “enduring trying circumstances with even temper”. Webster’s Dictionary.

Patients should not be patient with this.

It is important that physicians remember the Hippocratic Oath they took and understand this:

What is the essence of a Hippocratic Oath? Simple and echoed throughout time, whatever the words: “May I care for others as I would have them care for me.”
Daniel G. Deschler, M.D., FACS

As leaders of health care teams physicians need to set an example to all people in the health care setting.  If there is to be change, there needs  to be political activism on the part of physicians.  Health care should be available to all.  Physicians need to be paid, but also duly rewarded for honoring  the Oath they take on the day they become physicians.

 

Patient-Centered Medicine Part 2

WE ARE ALL PATIENTS!

The etymology of the word “Patient” is described on  Webster’s site  as:

derived from the Latin word patiens, the present participle of the deponent verb pati, meaning “one who endures” or “one who suffers”. Patient is also the adjective form of patience. Both senses of the word share a common origin.

On Graduation Day, medical students become MDs and repeat this Modern Hippocratic Oath.  Here are a few of the lines about patients.

I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick….

I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

It is important to know what physicians think about the Modern Hippocratic Oath. In 2001, Nova did a program on the Hippocratic Oath and invited physicians to add to a doctor’s diary.  I found the following comments fascinating and illuminating and wish to provide them here today.

I have done my best working as an overworked, underpayed academic physician in high-risk obstetrics in a metropolitan city teaching university since then [saying the Hippocratic Oath at graduation from medical school]. I look back to the wisdom and guidance of Hippocrates everyday as I struggle to balance my duties, patient rights and allocation of hospital/societal resources for the sake of underprivileged and acutely ill mothers and their unborn children.

It is particularly evident in this modern era when more students are choosing residencies in radiology, anesthesiology, and pathology for the sake of their lifestyle. Our outstanding residency program in OB/Gyn has difficulty in filling our slots because of significant workload and lifestyle issues. These Hippocratic Oath dissenters tend to openly complain about excessive clinical workload despite obvious patient needs. Many of these individuals rationalize a “shift-mentality” as their future practice of medicine that justifies going home when they are “off-duty” despite any other professional obligations. It appears that “job quality” is a priority when compared to “professional duty” in the medical practice of these particular future physicians.

Some of this new breed of colleagues also have a public display of disrespect for the indigent, confused, and simplistic patient. Instead of becoming an advocate and/or protector of society’s weakest element, they would discard this needy population in preference for the medical procedure, economizing their clinical practice or optimizing their time at home with family and friends.

The most disconcerting attitude within this subset of these “New Age” practitioners is the blatant contempt and disrespect for their elder colleagues in our medical profession. Stated reasons are outdated practitioners and oblivious perspectives to the “modern face” of medicine. While I am still at an intermediate stage in my professional career, I continue to learn more about the practice and ethics of my specific profession from my soon-retiring colleagues than from any journal, Web site, or national meeting.

Generation X has recently matriculated into the field of clinical medicine, and our national healthcare system will only suffer further when we tolerate physicians who do not care, apply inappropriate medical techniques, and have little professional respect for the patient-physician relationship as outlined in this product of early medical philosophy.

P.S. I continue to identify a small group of non-generation-X students and residents each year who defy this societal transformation and who strive to follow in the footsteps of myself and my elders. My solution for this “Gen X syndrome in medicine” is a realistic Third World medical experience for junior trainees (which I have done on several occasions) to give them a perspective that healthcare is a right for all human beings, not a scheduled or convenient privilege!!! —R.E.B.

R.E.B.’s comments describe a fundamental difference in newer physicians which I have described in my tribute previously.  The Occupy Health Care movement needs to address the issue described by R.E.B. “Some of this new breed of colleagues also have a public display of disrespect for the indigent, confused, and simplistic patient.” This attitude can be found in other types of health care providers, as well.  Dismissing social factors that affect health is part of this phenomenon.

 “In itself the definition of patient doesn’t imply suffering or passivity but the role it describes is often associated with the definitions of the adjective form: “enduring trying circumstances with even temper”. Webster’s Dictionary.

Patients should not be patient with this.

It is important that physicians remember the Hippocratic Oath they took and understand this:

What is the essence of a Hippocratic Oath? Simple and echoed throughout time, whatever the words: “May I care for others as I would have them care for me.”
Daniel G. Deschler, M.D., FACS

As leaders of health care teams physicians need to set an example to all people in the health care setting.  If there is to be change, there needs  to be political activism on the part of physicians.  Health care should be available to all.  Physicians need to be paid, but also duly rewarded for honoring  the Oath they take on the day they become physicians.